Elyce Williams

School: 
Hunter College
Graduation Status: 
Graduated

Description:

I am currently a first year PhD student at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill in the field of Neuroscience. I graduated from Hunter College with a bachlor degree in Psychology. This past summer of 2014, I had the pleasure of working in Dr. Laurie Cutting’s lab at Vanderbilt University. There I explored the connection between socioeconomic status and brain structure as one develops over the course of a lifespan. This Fall of 2014, I will join Dr. Michael Siller’s lab here at Hunter College, where I will study levels of severity of Autism through parent-child interactions and how that is reflected in child communication skills.

As I continue to further my own education, by pursuing graduate school to obtain my Ph.D., my desire is to work in the area of developmental neuroscience as it relates to the growth and changing of the brain, and/or behavioral/cognitive neuroscience as it pertains to memory, perception, and learning. I hope to do research that inspires change and evolution of classroom curriculum. I want my research to play a role in the building and improvement upon of teaching methods, exploring different learning styles in children as early as preschool. I am also interested in the effects of anxiety and social stigma on children and how that affects brain development as well as learning and comprehension ability.

Presentation Summary:

  • In Progress
  • Williams, E., Swett, K., Kang, H., Landman, B., Cutting, L.A Cross-Sectional MRI Study Exploring the Effects of Socioeconomic Status on Gray Matter Brain Volume throughout the Lifespan. The 43rd Annual Hunter College Psychology Research Convention 2015
  • Williams, E., Swett, K., Kang, H., Landman, B., Cutting, L. A Cross-Sectional MRI Study Exploring the Effects of Socioeconomic Status on Gray Matter Brain Volume throughout the Lifespan. The 2015 Hunter Undergraduate Research Conference
  • Williams, E., Swett, K., Kang, H., Landman, B., Cutting, L. The Implications of Socioeconomic Status on Brain Structure: A Cross-Sectional MRI Study ENDURE SfN 2014
  • Williams, E., Swett, K., Kang, H., Landman, B., Cutting, L. The Implications of Socioeconomic Status on Brain Structure: A Cross-sectional MRI Study. Poster presented at Vanderbilt Summer Science Academy. (August, 2014).