Ilana Deyneko

School: 
Hunter College
Graduation Status: 
Current

Description:

I am a junior majoring in Biology with a concentration in Behavioral Neuroscience. I am interested in the role of various neurotransmitters and modulators in the brain as well as the potential for neuro-regeneration within the adult central and peripheral nervous systems. This summer I had completed an internship with Dr. Anita Disney at Vanderbilt University, where I helped define populations of calcium binding proteins in different areas of the visual cortex. Currently I am working with Dr. Carmen Melendez-Vasquez, where we study the mechanisms that are necessary for the processes of myelination. Following graduation, I will pursue a Ph.D. or an MD/Ph.D. in neuroscience.

Presentation Summary:

  • Deyneko, I. V., Moran, H. M., Urbanski, M. M., Melendez-Vasquez, C. V. (2016). Effects of Microtubule Destabilizing Drugs on CNS Myelination. Poster presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Laboratory Glia in Health and Disease Conference. Cold Springs Harbor
  • Deyneko, I. V., Moran, H. M., Urbanski, M. M., Melendez-Vasquez, C. V. (2016). Effects of Microtubule Destabilizing Drugs on CNS Myelination. Poster presented at the 29th Annual International Symposium of the Center for Translational and Basic Research (C
  • Deyneko, I. V., Moran, H. M., Urbanski, M. M., Melendez-Vasquez, C. V. (2016). Effects of Microtubule Destabilizing Drugs on CNS Myelination. Poster presented at the Hunter Undergraduate Research Symposium. New York, NY.
  • Deyneko, I. V., Coppola, J. J., Morrow-Jones, D. P., Disney, A. A. (2015). Stereological Counts of Parvalbumin- and Calretinin-Immunoreactive Neurons in Visual Areas MT and V4 of the Macaque Monkey. Poster presented at 45th Annual Society for Neuroscience
  • Deyneko, I. V., Coppola, J. J., Morrow-Jones, D. P., Disney, A. A. (2015). Stereological Counts of Parvalbumin- and Calretinin-Immunoreactive Neurons in Visual Areas MT and V4 of the Macaque Monkey. Poster presented at Vanderbilt Summer Science
  • In progress